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Full text of "Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Parks Monthly Reports, August 1929"



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10-23 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Yellows tone.... national park 



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Z«Jlrf**f) FILE NO. /^J> 



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•MONTHLY REPORT FOR £ 

AUGUST ^ 

1929 G 



IMPORTANT 

his file constitutes a part of the official records of the 
ional Park Service and should not be separated or papers 
ldrawn without express authority of the official in charge. 
II Files should be returned promptly to the File Room, 
fficials and employees will be held responsible for failure 
bscrve these rules, which are necessary to protect the integ- 
of the official records. 

STEPHEN T. MATHER, 
rr mixmo »rric« un 6-7410 Director. 






DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 
YELLOWSTONE PARK. WYO. 



I OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



sopt. 10, 1929 



The Director, 

national Parte Service, 
4sMngton, D* C# 

Dear jfr* Sireotort 

Following is the report on the activities of the National iark i>er- 
vice in Yellowstone National iark during the month of 1*0*1% 1929* 

000 - General 

Conditions in the park during the month were normal and travel 
was considerably in excess of any previous season* On august 34 the 
Superintendent with the Chief Ranger and several members of the park or^ani- 
sation were called to Glacier National lark to aid in fi; htin:; the forect 
fires which wore rating there* The Superintendent returned on September 5t 
and the Chief Banker and the other men on Jeptember 8* 

*ja epidemic of digestive disorders prevailed in the parte during 
the period from Ufust 3 to about *ogaat 8* The condition was most serious 
at the Lake Hotel* iaployees as well as coasts at all points in the park 
were affected by this epidemic* It is reported that similar conditions pre- 
vailed at a number of places outside of the park and elsewhere in the 
country* Dr* ■• F* Cogswell, : ontana utate Board of Health, made an inspect- 
ion trip and was unable to determine the Cause of the outbreak, making the 
MCgestion that if the trouble continued a complete invest! ration by a U.S* 
btiblic Health Service officer be made* Ur« . . .; tanner of the U*S« cubli 
Health Service was sent to the park to conduct a special invest! x,t ion in 
connect! m with this epidemic but was unable to determine the exact cause 
of the trouble* A complete report regarding his findings will be made to 
the 3ur{7eon enerul of the U*S# /ublic Health Service* 

100 - Administration 

110 - o tutus of *Ork 

Director ^Ibri^ht was in the park during the first six days in 
ist, leaving; the ni^ht of August 6 via Gardiner for T;ocky fountain Kat- 
ional i-artc* The Superintendent was absent from the park from anigt 24 unt-1 
the end of the month, bavin?: been called to -lacier National i^ark to aid in 
the fii'htine of the forest fires tharo. .Hiring his absencs .sslstant -Super- 
intendent It* 7* .Oaun was in charts* 



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120 - rark Inspsotlons By 
121 - junerintendent 

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On AUf-ast 1, in company with director lbrirht, I went to Old 
faithful to be present at the nomine of the new oyeer by the Kational 
Jditoriul . r.sociation party* I returned to headquarters that evenln • On 
,vu. ust 7, in corajjany with Jr. Franc le Qftstler, I want to Old Faithful 
and returned to headquarters the same evenln*. • On «.u<ttst 10 I went to 
JJadison Junction to inspect the new trailside museum and ran. er station 
being constructed, there and returned to headqtu rters that ni'ht. On Auust 
12 1 went to Old Taithful and spent the ni^ht there, rotamin to headquarters 
the following, day Tie Lake and Canyon* On the afternoon of M|pft 17* in 
company with Lir* ; rosvenor ^ttorbury* architect from Row York City* I went 
to old Faithful to look over the area there* retarnini; to headquarters for 
the ni: ht. On the afternoon of the lBth I went to Canyon and returned to 
headquarters that evening* On the afternoon of flgini 20, in company vith 
Park rhotoerapher J* li ilaynea and Assistant to tho Jiiperlntendont Joffe* I 
made the trip to the JJonument eyser Basin near ibbon Meadows* On the 
monunc of August 21 I met Dr* .illlam John Cooper, ooramissionor of -duoa- 
tion and a member of the Resident* s Goramisi-ion on #uo&tional Htfe in the 
Rational Parks , and v/ith him proceeded to Old Faithful, lake and Canyon* 
Dr* Cooper remained at Canyon over ni ht and I returned to headquarters* On 
the mornin* of AUj-ust 23 I met Messrs* Lowry and Taylor of the Northern 
Pacific Pmilway at 'Jar diner to discuss the Gardiner bridge site with them* 
On the aornin of AagMtt 24, in company with Chief IJanj^r Bar ley, Assistan 
Chief iianger lYisehman, iark lian >rs cletnghlin, Miller, Johnston and Childs, 
and liaster iieohtailc liobinson, I proceeded to >lacier Rational £ark by oar 
to aid in figbting the destructive forest fires there* The period from 
august 24 to $1 inclusive was spent away from the Yellowstone* 

I25 - Rational Xiafk Service Officers 

Director Horace li* i.lbrlfht. who had entered the park on July 15, 
remained until .-.utrust f>, on which date he left via Gardiner for ?ocky 
Mountain Ration ~x* 

Mr* Kenneth 0* MoCarter. assistant to Chief Landscape Architect 
Vint, spent the entire month in the park* 

,.lr* Curl Baohem, Land Expert for the Rational -ark Service, enter- 
ed via <0Bt Yellowstone on *u%ust 4 «*»* lo** vl£ * fliTiH—ff on the 10th for 
Glacier Rational iark* T.ile in the Yellowstone Kr* Bachem was in poor 
health and most of his time wan spent in the hospital* 

Chief feflneer F* ^. ittred e entered the park at the south fjate 
on An^nst 12 and left via urdiner on the 14th enroute to Glacier lark* 
Durinr his stay in the Yellowstone Wtt ittredite covered the neater part 
of our road system and was in conferenoe with the Superintendent and the 
assistant Superintend ent at headquarters* 

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■■, . , lossoio, auditor for the park service, oatae in the 
wast jjr-te on Au^ist 29. Ho will spend sore© time hare lookinr over the 
accounts of the various park operators. 

Mr. Garl P. Russell, Field Naturalist for the National ark Jer- 
viee, spent the entire month of l t in the park in connection with 

educational work. 2lr. Hussell has been in the part?: since July 4» 

125 - other overaaontal Officers 

i2r. Fred Foster, special fish euiturist for the national iark 
Service and the Bureau of Fisheries, spent raost of the month in the Yellow- 
stone looking after fish culture, work. He hat been hero since July 10, 

Mr. J. D. Donit, Mr. Felix Crietoffene and Kr« 2, .. T abody from the 
enerul ..coountin Office at ^.sehinrton, D. C, entered the park 1 liner 

on Aurust 21 and remained here until u ust 27, when they left via the earn 
gateway. 2heir time here was spent in rcin^ ovor accounting matters in the 
office and inspecting park operations, 

l>r, It R. Spencer of the United states Public Health Service cane 
in the park v*.a Gardiner on aagsaTt 21 and left via the suras gateway on aug- 
ust 26, Dr. pencer was assigned to conduct an invejti .at ion of the epidemic 
which was active in the park froa about 1 m% 3 *o 8. 

I27 - Other ^cmoiea 

Mr. ill 111 ::• Mhj MsftflMril to special |sjr* ptj .... & >n wMi on the 
park wild life, spent most of the WKK0k in investigations a.vi on office end 
laboratory work. Near the end of the itomth Mr. ansh was called ha* to duty 
with the U. 8, Forest Service in order to e>14 in florost fire work in itontane. 
and Idaho. 

Dr. 3. T. Allen of the eophysioal Laboratory of the Carnegie 
Institution spent the entire raonth on the study of the thermal activities in 
the park. Dr. Allen has been here since June b. 



Dr. Arthur L. Day, .Director of the Geophysical laboratory at 
lngton, D, C, cone in at the west i-jate on August 29 and will spend about 
a aonth in the geyser regions conducting some special drilling work to deter- 
mine the formations in the eyser rations. 

Dr. U. L. ifiaeon of the Game ie Institution who has been in the 
Tower Falls and Uveoirasn Ridge area in connection with work pertaining to the 
petrified trees, left via Gar linear August 11. Dr. l&son has been in the perk 
since June 21. 



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Dr* Frank R* Oaetler, s member of the ^resident's Commission on 
Sdnoational work In the national curies, entered at G&rdinsr on Input 4 and 
left via the mm gateway on .u,*ust lb* He studied the educational work 
which was going on in the Yellowstone and included in hie trip a visit to 
the Gr&aL Teton Actional Jterk* 

Dr. "illiam John Cooper. Commissioner of aiunatinn end a member of 
the iTecident's Commission on I-Huaational in the Hatiomi Barks* enter- 

ed at Gardiner on August 2\ and left via Cody on the 22nd* He made a hurried 
inspection of the park in company with the Buporint anient* 

idO • U.bor Situation 

There was a sufficient supply of men available for work in the park 
and we had no difficulty in keeping our forces complete durinr the month* 
By the end of the month it was necessary to release sons of the men, due to 
the lessening cf activities* 

1^0 - dyaiysjent and Supplies 

She folios! ag itens of major equipment were received d sarin;- the 



months 



2 - lijht Ford trucks 

1 - half sack concrete mixer 



I70 - Plans , gaps* and Purveys 

The survey crew completed the relocation of the telephone line from 
Lake to *humb f started the surveys of the road reconstruction ten miles west 
of Madison Junction and near the Jfaunt.tln i-aint rot el; -at miles north of Old 
faithful end continued the Gallatin raid construction surveys* 

l8o - Circulars, Bulletins, etc* 

Circulars l*oe* 13 and 14 were Issued durin the month* A number of 
MSaorauua for the press were released and copies are attached hereto* A copy 
of the Suture Notes for August Is also attached* 

200 - Maintenance , Impr oveme nts an d New Construction 

The regular crews that usually maintain the roads were su/pleraented 
with the heavy maintenance outfit In order to reshape the lake-Canyon and Xaks- 
Thumb sections which have becoms exceedingly rou^-h on account of sub&rade 
troubles* Other vise no particular difficulty was encountered during the 
month except after the heavy rainstorm of ^-u^ast 2% at which time our north 
entrance road was covered with debris and the other roads were badly rutted 
on account of heavy traffic darin*; the storm* 






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At the end of the month a proadraately one hundred sixty miles 
of road had been given one or more applications of road oil for dust pre- 
vention* Approxitaately 498.000 gallons of oil were used in this operation 
Considerable difficulty was encountered this year In maintaining a smooth 
oil mat surface on account of the traffic increase* This was especially 
true where the subgrade oonsisted of loose sand which kicked out very 
rapidly after the surface mat was worn through* 

220 • improvements 

£*£££ li e £ -ZPSEL ^ carpenter crow spent practically the entire 
month repairing reader stations at the 3ast fotranoe, Lake, Pishing Bridge 
and 3outh Entrance* 

^ineerlng department i Considerable time was devoted to the 
study of traffic conditions and parking areas alon the roads in addition 
to the usual road maintenance and construction supervision* 

^le^ojtr^cal^I)e^rteientt A study was conducted during; the month, 
of the operation of the hydroeTectric plant in order to make recommendations 
for the winter's repair work* The usual telephone maintenance was carried 
on during the month upon the $1$ miles of lines which we have in operation 
at the present time* The heavy maintenance work on the Lake - Thumb line 
was completed with the rebuilding of eight miles of line from lake using 
new poles and installing metallic circuit* 

The 15 miles of line up Jlough Creek* which was repoled and wired 
for metallic circuit* was completed this month, as was two miles of lino up 
the Lamar P.iver. 

The telephone line between headquarters and the al latin Manner 
Station, about 22 miles long* was thorou hi ; overhauled and placed in condi- 
tion for the coming year* This oonsisted in resetting and replacing most of 
the poles as no work has been done a ion this line for several years* 

lfcch|mijtolJ5sj^rtaienti_ The work of this department consists of 
maintainin. and operating the ^""trucks and other pieoes of mechanical equip- 
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grounds i_ Several tons of hay were cut from the parade {-round and 
stored for~w inter game feeding and the neoessary arrangements were being made 
for the winter care of grounds* 

230 - Hew Cons traction - Hoads and Buildings 

£e£tj.iallaUn - ^rayHngJ3rjsjak^^ec^ion£ *> pproximately five and a 
half railes""on The e"outh end "of this section were opened to travel by the end 
of the month, thereby elirainatin; the worst of the old road* Much better 
progress is being made due to the ohangs in the type of material handled from 
boulders to solid rook and dirt* 



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J&*t^£tnw± £roj*ctt ft>rk on this i reject has r* 
eutisf&.cto7iTy7~i"hV"four raiTes of contract v/ork started last year is pra- 
ctically complete sxcspt for the 35,000 yard fill near Station 350 upon which 
t.vo st can shorsls hare been plaeed* 

About the 2<jth construction started at Sylvan *ass working both 
ways* On the east side considerable difficulty was encountered in the slide 
rock which is a nass of ice and rook* . ;proxi<.iatoly one quarter of a mile 
of the road through the iase has been opened up to date* A snail half yard 
shovel was placed in operation on the Cub Creek section* prepurinr the sub- 
grade for surfacing This work consists of removing elides, buildin up 
shoulders and fills which have settled and which it was impossible to do out 
of our maintenance fund* 

iJSKAHSJLfti lO^Zf&SL ^BPh?~. ^k* 8 bulldin; was completed with the 
parti tioning**of the building into a room for summer em?;loyees and unother 
room for winter quarters* 

^now^l^jCabte^aJt Ijadi sen £^o_tipnjt_ This bui ding was completed 
except for~mTnor inside" Jinishlii*""* 

Extension and £n^tf*ameirt of_<vato Pi^S*** ^ke v;oric * hie won* 1 * co °- 
sisted of building garbage etunds*, tabTee, fireplaces, roads and guard rails 
in the rhumb ~uto Gamp area* 



J^tensioa and A^wemmt 2C , ^ fe l r ~ a ^~ J •Tl ^ -. u 2 B l•2, , -. 5n# WJ »*w 
system was~extended To service~"the - Lake road ©amp ereVwith minor extensions 
in the Thumb Auto Camp* Additional sewage disposal facilities were construct- 
ed In the Thumb Auto Camp to supplement the disposal system constructed in 
1926. 

Stable atJLake* This stable is oomplete except for the roof 

^tablejit Cjjnyonj^ The foundation for this building was constructed 
duriiir: the""raonth* " 

240 - Iaprovoroent of Approaches to the i'ork 

Horth ^Jtr^£e^. < cp£oaohi It is possible to drive from kirdiner to 
Liv in*: st on"over The new route* on"the east side of the Yellowstone iUver. 
Approximately 11 miles of surf^oed highway from Hne Creek south have bean 
processed this month and 11 miles of highway betv/een .tine Creek and Livin ston 
is being; resurfaced and will be oil processed In September* 

'£*— '^SyPJi iiREW^LPSf^L* Cloven railes of the road frern Tar ghee 
ass south has been resurfaced with two inches of crushed rock and elrht miles 
of it oil processed* On account of the oold weather that is prevailing at the 
present time the progress of the work is very slow* The Jtato of Montana is 
contemplating oil prooessinr the road from Targhee lass to est Yellowstone, a 
distance of ten miles, in September* 

The road through the i&di son Canyon upon which a contract was let 
last spring has about five milee from t forest boundary through the Hadison 
Canyon completed* The remainder of this r d is in very poor shape and is 

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:3ant ^trane* >uch Roadi^ i'he contract v*>rk between Rattlesnake 

Creek and the jhoshono River project Ts practically complete. 

260 - Land soups Division 

lbs following report la submitted by Mr. Kenneth C. MoCarter, 
Assistant Chief Landsoupo architect » 

" Cons truot ion on buildings ms actively pursued during the month 
throughout the park* A new trails! d© museum was commenced at Uorrls C-ty- 
eer Basin* A general store building for Mr* Hamilton was started at Fish- 
in;; Bridge in conformity with the revised layout of that area. Road im- 
provements were made at vVest Thumb. Cafeteria and housekeeping headquarters 
building was begun at Canyon ^uto Camp* Linen room with dormitories above 
was started at Canyon Lodge* The garage compound alterations and additions 
at Canyon liotel were completed. 

"Both road projects continued active and considerable cleanup was 
accomplished. Maintenance work on roads other thi^n the two major projects 
has done much on cleanup by asin,- the unei? htly spall rook where needed for 
fill." 

300 - activities of Other agencies in the iarlc 

311 - Character of 3orvioe Rendered to the labi le 

All park operations were ia full swint- durin the month and 
visitors throughout the park were well taken ears of. 

400 - Flora* Fauna end B a turul /heaomana 

410 - Banger* tJaturalist and Guide Service 

Increased activities were carried on durin.:. the month on a some- 
what different scale* A few changes were made in the temporary ranger 
force, and towards the end of the month we had considerably less temporary 
rangers than last season* nevertheless public contact with tourists was on 
the same scale but at the earns time forest insect control* fish propagation 
and increased fire hasards took a great many of the men from their usual 
line of duties* Permanent rangers assigned to fire patrol started the fall 
work on cabin repairing and this season we are go in- to build cellars In 
all of the cabins for the benefit of the winter patrol work, which means 
that v/o are going to have more vegetables in the cabins, so that one can 
a longer sU.y in such putroling districts* 



Rangers anc-i ned to fire patrel fnysjrtil MfefWU fiVN threw heat 
the park, and some of them on the outside of the boundaries, which in all 
oases were quickly extinguished* 



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A meting was held at Lake to discuss the forest insect problem 
and forage conditions* A decision was rendered whereby the Assistant Chief 
Bangers under the supervision of the Chief Hanger, MH to rake a the- 
inspection of their respective districts in order to map out the areas in- 
fected by forest insects, to estimate the extent of damage, and to deter- 
mine, if posolblo, the beet methods for fMOWlslm* proper control measures* 
Assistant Chief i«*s of the western district, after m thorough 

inspsotion reports no mountain ;:ine beetle in that district. The same 
holds true of the southern district. Assist eif lean, er 3ton , 

assisted by Bankers Anderson and lliott, made a 12-day pack trip into the 
new extension on the eastern boundary, and reports beetle infected areas 
on Cache 0frMfc 9 . iller Creek, Calfee, Lamar, Uoodoo Basin, 'old Creek, 
Frost Lake, Uist Lake, isllcan L'irror Plateau, and all streams entering into 
the Lamar from the west* Beetles were not found in creat numbers, but fro- 
all indications they had been there for saveral years. To date the species 
of the bcotle has not been determined, a thorough report v^ill be turned in 
to the Bureau of intomology and action no doubt will be taken by them* 

420 - Hussua Service 

Old ^toful_%ejsu»i_ 3ftK During the past month the Old Faithful 
iMaseum has-been Ov>en~Vrom f aVto 10 pm each day and 4p»07° persons have 
availed themselves of the opportunities offered in this buildir? . lie 
relief map of the Upper Basin has been varnished and a protection rail has 
been placed around it* This nap has drawn forth many favo ruble commonts 
from the visitors at the museum* Illustrated evening lectures have been 
given daily in the open court and the attendance has averaged 500 per 
lecture* 

Mammotti j£useua£ The liarcmoth iiusoum has beon open daily from 7 an 
to 10 pra throu hout the month and 24,103 persons were served at this build- 
ing during the month of august* The flower exhibit has attracted consider- 
able attention throughout the summer due to the tireless efforts of Hre* 
..mold, Jpeciraens were exhibited during the past month* 64 a result of the 
new research program initiated this year, 33 study skins of small nanaals 
have been added to our collection by Or* &de of Tower Balls* Host of 
these are new specimens and in only fcvo or three Instances were any speci- 
mens in the former collection duplicated* Hotable among these skins are 
those of a flying squirrel and two conies* 

430 - Buffalo Co rral 

The total attendance at the Buffalo Corral lurin the month of 
augast was 18,903, as compared with 2/!,800 for 1<£8, and 20,000 in 1927, 



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>/lld animals throughout the park v/cre reported to have been seen 
by tourists throughout the month. The weather conditions during the month 
were very dry, and a considerable decrease in forage conditions was noted 
In some of the lower country, although if one were to travel into the hi 
plateaus and heavily timbered country, forage conditions would be found to 
be exceptionally rood* 

Jlkt Owing to the decrease In flies, a great number of elk were 
seen In all parts of the park, and especially through liayden Valley and 
31k Park, All calves seen with the cows were in splendid condition and no 
decrease wus noted amon them* The month of *.ugust finds the oik greatly 
scattered throughout the park, very seldom seen in large bands* On August 
28 the whistle of the bull elk was heard on Mirror x lateau, which Is the 
first sign that the mating of the b^a elk has started* There are not to 
be seen so numerous gams trails through the ilirror 1 lateau district, for 
the fast diminishing old game trails are rapidly being covered v/lth grasses* 
At one time all game trails leading up Pelican and join through the Ilirror 
Plateau, coming out on Ureoiraon Ridge were, no doubt, the main game trails 
in Yellowstone* 

^eerj^ A questionnaire has been sent out to all the rangers in 
regard to the* feeding habits of the deer* All have not been returned, and 
whet have been returned do not give us a clear enough report at this time* 

Antelo^e^ The antelope are scattered throughout their summer 
range, andTfortlge conditions for them are very goon* Wot very large numbers 
have been counted along the highway from Cooke City to Gardiner, but at 
this time, one will find numerous antelope at the head of the Blaoktall 
country* 

Itoosei Close observe tione of the moose were token on the trip 
through Mirror *■ lateau, and a surprisingly large number of signs and moose 
were to be seen there* Ho doubt Hirror, Fern, Tern, hits and /apiti Lakes 
are a shallow boggy typical foedin 1 round for the moose* a large bull 
moose has been seen daily from Tower Falls ranger station, and has been a 
great treat to many tourists passing there* 

Buffalo - Ifuoar Hiver Hard*. The buffaloes have been wandering 
back and forth from The head~of Cache Creek ridge to the lamer iver* A 
party of 11 dudes were seen traveling on the Miller Creek ridges trying to 
locate the buffalo* From a conversation with them, only one buffalo wee 
seen by this party* Forage conditions were very good, and all calves seen 
were In good condition* Humorous buffalo signs were loo: tori throughout 
Mirror Plateau, and the head of Pelloan Creek* Ho doubt some of these were 
the mountain herd* 

3hee£S_ This month finds the sheep in the high, almost inaccessible 
places, end" evezTalong the lit* Heshbum ridges tourists have reported very 
few* 



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Bearai n estimate of the total number of bears from all dis- 
tricts in The park were as followsi griesly or silver tip, 132} black, brown 
and cinnamons, 4241 total 556. a groat many reports have been received, 
both oral and written, at this of rice. In last month's report, the depre- 
dations by bears seemed to be on the increase, and from ail estimates, this 
month* s reports rapidly increased over last* Canyon reports the largest 
numbers throughout the parkt 70 blacks and browns and 58 crliiliaa* 

anal l ^nimalsi The beaver seem to be on the increase , as numerous 
reports have been received of beaver in moot all of our streams* *ii?.;ht 
boaver wore seen alon* the mouth of I oilcan* The marmot and ground squirrel 
are seldom seen now* The rauskrats have started storing their winter upply, 
and building houses* 

^redttorg; -34j*al£*_. */hile on the forest insect patrol, nunorous 
coyotes wero~soon on the hi.: h ridjjes, oatchin,, their daily feed of mice and 
inseote* hile dropping off the rid«:o of Saddle fountain into the head of 
the Lamar River, a contact wa made with two trappera, who trapped the Lamar 
country last winter* Having no report of wolverine in Yellowstone for q jil ta 
soma years, the question was asked these trappers if they had ever seen any 
wolverine tracks in thut country* They stated that last winter five wolver- 
ine trucks were seen crossing east of Uaddle Mountain toward ollux Peak* 
This information, no doubt, was true, which leads us to believe that there 
are still wolverine In this vicinity* 

Fishi^ The Bureau of Fisheries ourried on their usual distribution 
of fry and oees throughout the park. The 190,000 f in; jar lings which were 
placed In the tan new rearing ponds at Hammoth did not do ao gals* These were 
found to be infected with a fin-rot, and stepa ha-l to be taken to distribute 
them aa quickly aa possible throughout the park* dumber 4 fin? erlin^s were 
placed in Lava Creek, Tlllow Park, Gardiner Uvar, Nes leroe. Fire ifole. 
Gibbon and Blacktail >eer Creek* These ware all a£ tto brook trout* Ifumber 2 
fincerlincs were placed in the Gardiner P.iver, Fire Hole and Madison* These 
were the Loch Leven trout* Hunber 5 flngerlinga ware placed in the Yellow- 
stone Kiver, Gardiner, Gibbon and Fire Holo* These were the rainbow trout • 
There are approximately 94*0°° fish yet to be put out from the iiumoth ponds* 
9883 fiah ware taken from the park during the month of «u;ust by tourists* 

BujTfalo and_ other ^inch i^ratijonoj^ The new bunk houae has been 
oomploted aVthe Buf?Uo KanohT ~iT»~oM7f~buftfalo keeper has started other 
new construction, tearing out part of the old corral and also roplacinr a new 
squaeae, which will be very beneficial if the somewhat talked-of blood test i 
to be made of the buffalo this full, due to *3» possible contagious abortion 
«T t£sfli* Iluyinf; operations are finished* approximately 450 tons of hay was 
put up this season* llayinc operations are completed at the Slouch Creak Ranch, 
lanoey Ranch, and Gome ^raeervation Hanoh* One hundred thirteen tons of hay 
waa ataoked at the Game x. reservation Rsaeh* rSTTm the Jlouj h Greek and 

Yanoay ranohae haa not bean measured to data* 

-10- \ 


















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Ifemaot h Vjpt Spring** On the terraces the month of Aagnet was marked 
by the unexpected*"" The Flue prints stopped flowing fctt eon 11*30 am and 1.50 
pa on June 29* Within the space of two hours tho water stepped flowing, dis- 
appeared, and the fortaution became bone-dry* There was a noticeable increase 
in the activity of Jupiter 'err oe immediately* It then appeared that it was 
the end of the Blue Springs, but the next day they began to flow acain slowly* 
st the present time they are buck to normal* 

The little spouter on Angel Verraoe jumped to a height of six inches 
on August 5» By August 11 Its height increased to eight inches. It continued 
to increase in height up to ten Inches and on -u.ust 22 dropped back to throe 
or four inches* It stopped on JflgHN 31* 

A new spring oaae into exi stance Just east of Harrow Qua; e on 
August 17* It appears to be of the fissure type tnd contained considerable 
yellow algae within a week* At the present time pink and orange algae are also 
starting to grow* Hew activity in the form of considerable cas pressure was 
notloed about the middle of Marrow niage on August 21* The new spring does 
not seem to have af footed the activity of narrow Guage thus far* 

Minerva continues to be quite active* The stalactites hanging from 
the roof of the oave on the southwest side have grown considerably this summer, 
and have almost closed the opening* The activity on the south side is stronger 
than ever and the oolorir» is very fine* A new spring broke out on Hinerva* 
northwest of the present active place on August lb* Several more tiny springs 
broke forth in the old oruter of I Inerva on August 21. They have not changed 
much since their birth* 

Part of the west side of Hymen Terrace stopped flowing on the after- 
noon of August 21* It was feared that this boauty spot had oome to an end* 
but the next day it started flowing again* It soon recovered its usual actlvi.y 
but on Aegust 31 a pa** of it had become inactive again* 

HPI*£ £°j^ e . , L% 8 i? l JL '^e aonth °* August has been one of considerable 
interest in the Upper ~e3/se¥"Basin* The Giant Peyser played four times during 
the month as far ae was to be observed* It played on the 1st* the 7th, the 
20th* and the 27th* The Giantess Geyser was in eruption on the 28th and 29th* 
This is the third time this season it has shown geyser action, but the previous 
two periods of activity were characterised mostly by steam* The eruption the 
last of august, ho ®ver a was characterised by the beautiful fountain types of 
eruptions throwing water to a height of more than 12 5 feet* At 8*40 as en the 
28th there were eight geysers in eruption at the same time, these eight bei 
Daley, old faithful. Grand, Giantess, Turban, Spasmodic, Sawmill and rot to* 

Investigations as to the possibility of an 'indicator" for the r^nd 
Geyser show that there is no such thing* On August 2? it erupted at an eight 
hour interval, and on the 31st with a two-hour interval - in fact on the letter 



-11- 



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date thsra ware throe eruptions in nine hours* These much shortened 
intervals of the rand Geyser are of considerable interest for it has always 
been considered to erupt at a ten hour to twenty five hour interval* -t 
one tine 33 spurts wore observed, and this is of intGroat for it ha6 \>&ov. 
considered to rarely have as many as 20 spurts* 

The Vault erupted on the 2r th, and the docket hat shown increased 
ctivlty the last three weeks of the month, playing to a height of 70 feet 
at timet* 

520 - general leather Conditions 

521 - In the dearie 

August was the warmest since 1894 a» a the mean temperature* 64*8° 
ie the second highest on record for this month* Temperatures were above 
normal from the 11th to the 31st t inclusive, and only two days previous to 
that time were below normal* The highest was B7 on the 14th, the lowest 
/|2° on the 10th* 

Extremely dry weather with only occasional 11, ht showers prevail- 
ed until the latter part of the month* On both the 28th and 29th heavy 
ruins occurred, brln the total for the month above normal* This is the 
first month since the bediming of the year with more than the normal amount 
of precipitation* There were thunderstorms on ten days and ei;ht days with 
0*01 inch, or more, precipitation* 

Slightly more than the average amount of sunshine was recorded* 
The tofel wae 344 hour*}, 79 per cent of the possible amount* There were 13 
olear days, 12 portly cloudy, six cloudy* 

540 - Visitors 

Hon* Francis 8* Warren, V*3. 'enator from vyominjr, entered the 
park at the south .-ate on *>u net 12 and loft via the east gate on the 13th* 
9s was accompanied by Mr* George 3* Brimmer, of Cheyenne, >/o* 



Hon* Frank C* «erson. Governor of >«yomint;, oame into the park on 
August 31 with his two sons and spent the ni^ht of the 31st at Old Faithful, 
leaving the folla~inc day* This ie a^vernor Person's second viait to the 
park this summer* 

Vtocu '.7* J* Halloway, Governor of Oklahoma, entered the park at the 
east gate on August 14 and left via the west gats August lo* He was in his 
swb oar* 

Mr* Thomas Cochran, New York financier, entered the park at Gard- 
iner on August 4* spending the night at Mammoth* The following day he pro- 
ceeded to his Silver Tip Ranch near the northeast corns r of the park and 
left via .'est Yellowstone on August 8* Mr* Cochran re-entered the park at 
the west gate on August 27 and left via the north gate iiwpst 31* 

-12- 






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Jfir* Horace iici&vid, ^ resident of Kiwanis International , entered 
the park at the north ^to on xiupust 14t leaving via the east fate on the 1 >th« 

U. s* Grant, Jr. Ownar of the B«§« Grant Hotel, San ©lego, ; lif • 
and eon of former I resident U*3* Grant, came in in his own oar at the 
Gardiner entrance on ^urust 25 and left via Cody on the 2-tJu 

Mr* rosvenor - tterbury, prominent architect of 7?ew York City, 
and ."-Tb. ^tterbury, entered the park at the south rate on August 14* follow- 
ing: a risit in the new Grand Teton National Bsjfca Mr, and Mrs* Atterbury 
left via the west £ate on August 19* 

George ..ashirv.ton Ocha Cakes of the New York Times entered the 
purk at the fast gute on iuaust 10 leaving via the same gateway on the 1 
Be was accompanied by his two sons. 

Mr* Frank Robinson* Vice-President of the Union Pacific System, 
entered the park at the south i.ate follow inc a tour of the new rand Teton 
Satioral i»ark. He left via the Kant gate on the 15th* 

David Whltcomb, former president of the H&inier national Park 
Company and at present one of the directors of the company, entered via 
Gardiner on .august 23 and left on the 30th* He included a visit to the 
Jackson : j ole country on his park trip* Ho was accompanied by his son* 

Dr* vaillam John Cooper, Commissioner of Vacation and a member 
of the President's Commission on >Jucational >'<©rk in the national mrks* 
oamo in at Gardiner on Awust 21 and left via Cody on the 22nd* Guporinten- 
dent Toll accompanied him from Gardiner to the Canyon, via Old Faithful 
and Lake* 

The State Boards of ai^inoeriny Examiners held a conference in 
the park at the Canyon Hotel On August 2fc>» Following the convention the 
members of the party continued on their park tour* 

The Wyoming Peace Officers Association and the Colorado Sheriffs 
and Peaoe officers association held a convention at Old Faithful c< ;st 

26 and 27* The party included sheriffs from Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebr- 
aska and Montana* 

Mrs* -oorj-e Akerson* wife of the Secretary to the -resident* 
entered the park with her son at the east gate on August 9, leaving via the 
gateway on the 13th* 



• ,. Brido, CiorpomtlM Bfsjkjft for tho >ioiriet of 3ttaavia , 
entered the park at the east gate on MagMft lB and left via the west { te 
on the 22nd* 



-13- 






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is Jlark University 3a chool party under the direction 

of Bert 'aideine of the college of the City of Detroit, entered the park at 
the weet gate on au net 6 end left vi iner on the 13th* This party 

compos ed of Id, student e and the conductor and his wife* 

Mr* J* Sberhard fttber, noted manufacturer of pencils , entered 
the park at the weet gate end left via the north gate on August l&« Sir* 
Euber included in his park vieit a trip to the Bread Teton Hation&l iiark* 

Mr* »• 3* ffltepatriok, Chairman of the Board of the .irairie oil 
and Gae Company, independence, Missouri, entered the park at the south gtite 
August 7 and left via the north gate on August 13* 

Mr* Seth &• Gordon, conservation Director for the Isaak alt on 
League of .>mericu, with his wife and daughter, entered the park at the east 
gate on ^ugust 14 and left via the south on the iBtlu ^fter leaving; the 
Yellowstone fir* Cordon visited the Grand Teton National Park* 

Mr* Harry J, Berwick, manager of the lOaye clinic, Rochester, Minn* 
entered the park at Gardiner on the 15th and left via Cody on the l^th, 
making the regular Gardiner * Cody trip* 

The St* Louis Boy Scout Roving Camps ocas in at the east gate on 
Auguet 10 end spent about eight days in the park* The parly was mads up of 
about 5° Boy Scouts* 

The University of Nebraska Departments of >r tension and Geography 
party entered the park at the eaet gate on August 14 and loft via the west 
gate on the l8th* This party was composed of about 22 people* 

The Department of oology and Geography party from the 'estern 
Kentucky state Sternal School, Bowling Green, Kentucky, entered the park at 
the south gate on august 1* They spent about a week in the park* The party 
wae under the direction of Mr. George £« ood* 



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6l0 - >olioe i roteotlon 

Proceedings were had before the TJ* 3. Commissioner as follows! 

Hare e and address Offense Disposition 

3. B. Gardiner Speeding Fined -'18 and costs 

J* F. letting Speed r aed #l8 and costs 

liurtin Ahlberg (Y.iViotel Go. Possession of liquor Fined ^102. 18 

employee) 

Sanford liein (Y..r.Hotel Co* ossoesion of liquor lined -'102.18 

era loyee ) 

Otto Bode It.P.Hotal Co. Possession of liquor Fined 102.18 

employee) 

Thomas »• Hlckm* (EPS ere loyee) Speeding Fined $20 and costs 

Frank Higgle* ..est Yellowstone Mont* Possession of Fined | 500 and costs 

liquor 

Total arrests and convictions - 7. Total of fines imposed - 862.54. 

6 20 • Fire rro t a ction 

A total of six minor fires were reported in Yellowstone lark 
during the month of M uet. Five of these fires were oaused toy smokers, 
throwing lighted olgarettes or ma tehee in the brush, and one was caused by 
lightning* 

▲ major fire was discovered five and one half miles north of est 
Yellowstone, 200 yorde outside the park line, on August 11* This fire was 
caused by a lighted cigarette or i»itch. It was extinguished on Amgttftt 12, 
and was left as safe on Aumet 14* ■*• total time spent by park raners 
was seven days* Seventeen road men were on duty 20 hours each* An aret. of 
about 400 acree was burned, 125 of which were in timber. The fire rusvQr 
reached t!*a park lino* 

630 - accident a 

C.H.Hilssn, driving Ford, Lie* Ho. 1958, Utah, and 9$ il. Vickers, 
driving Dodge, Lie* Ko* 51-71% Idaho, In collision on Lake - Canyon road 
5 miles from Lake Junction. Immago slight* Time, iiugast 2. 

A Cadillac oar, Uo. No. 722-322, Illinois, owned by J. F. Jkyo, 
while stopped on a curve about 100 yards from Chittenden bridge on ^rtist'o 
ioint road wae struck by Y*jr.T.Co. bus Ho* 2^2, driven by J* Sager, dead- 
headin to the Lodge* Ur* Jkyo aooepted $5*00 damages to his ear. Time, 
August 2* 

-15- 



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James *'. Helson, driving studebaker. Lie* Ho* 42942O, lllnois, 
and Robert &rdn«r, drivl .ipmobilo. Lie* Ho* 494$5» T 'tah, in collision 
four uxxd oat* Ik.if aiiles north of Ola Faithful, on August 3« ™he Hurraobile 
struck the .tudebaker on a turn. Kr* Heir tad |20 for danaagee* 

A Michigan rontiac, juIc* Ho* 47^47° » driven by Hiss Sail Clark, 
and H.F.3. Truck 563* driven "by Mr* Butler, in collision on liudison Junction- 
Horris road on August 3* ^He dual tire of the truck crashed into the 
rontiac oar, smashing a leather suitcase and contents, and other slight 
Mrs. Clark claimed damages. So settlement was made* 



Qua 21. Alquist, drivin -hdvrolet, Lie. No. 7P9298, c.-.Ufomia, 
struck Y.P.T.Co* bus Ho. 188 on '?humb - Lake road four miles south of Lake 
Hotel, on August 4* 2hfl driver of bus had stepped to pick up eye shade 
lost by a passenger* Slight damage to Chevrolet* 

An Alberta Ford, 'iodol-^. Lie* Ho* 81442, Alberta, owned by J* 
oywitka, rolled across pafwtm space at Tower /lis on Attgost 3, striking 
a Texas Ford, Lie* 141882, ovmed by ~..J*Buttles. The ;'ord was slightly 
damaged. An agreement was reached on the cround* 

Kuth Lindbloom, drivin; /novrolot. Lie. Ho* 966-621, MlnMpw, 
collided with a Colorado oar, auke and license of which are unknown, on 
Lake - Thumb ra*d on August 10* Jho Jbevrolet was badly damage!, but the 
othor oar was not located* 

Biyant :i. Clark, driving Ford Hodel-A, Lie. So. 65-^79, Utah, 
and L* 3. Olssn, driving Oldsmobile, lie* *!o* I-924, Utah, in collision on 
South .Entrance • -/est Thumb road, at el ht mile post, on .u ust 13. kr* 
Olsen agreed to pay all damages. 

Y.F.T.Co. bus Ho. 38, and Villys-<'ni; ht, Lie* No. 665454, Illin- 
ois, owaed by S.L.Fairbanks, in collision at ;olfion kite on Angnst 14» The 
Uys- Xnlght was quite baJly 3d, Mr. Fairbanks was referred to i2r. 

isha of the Transportation Co. 

Geortje Gray, driving Camp track Ho* 9, and lg «U Jtwart, 
driving Hash, Lie. Ho* II476, Colo., in collision at I'o-ver Falls, near the 
Tower Creefc bridge, August 14* **»•• Stewart was referred to Sir* .Moraan of the 
Lodge Co. 

Mrs* H. F. .rndt, driving aa .on ex, Calif. Lio. Ho. 8H5742, 
drove off the oabaakmont on the Morris Junction - Canyon Rond, on August lfi* 
The oar landed on its side, but was only slightly damaged* The passengers 
of the oar were slightly injured. 

V. V. Hob art son, driving Hash, Lio. So. 45&4t yomin;, while 
passing Y.P.T.Co* Bus Ho. 98 on West Thumb - Lake Junction road, ten and one 
half miles weet of Lake Hanger Station, met a Dodge truck. Lie. Ho* 6373 • °» 
driven by Bay Lynch, while abrest of the yellow bus. To avoid collision 
..illiam Clarkson, driving Bus 98, was foroed ovor to side of road, and his 
bus turned over. Two passengers in 3us 98 were sli htly injured. ?irae - 

-16- 



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▲ Dodge oar, Lie. No. 8P*>19, 8*1 If* f owned by ti* 1 laar, while 
perked on the "Bi§ SP curve, about 3/4 mile from the suns'!! t on the north 
eide of lit. fcehburn started to roll down the road. Mr. Klaar had loft 
the Cur to take some pictures, and when the oar started to move Mrs* Plaar 
Jumped from the oar. The oar overturned and rolled about 275 feet below 
the road. Car badly damaged* Time - AftgMt 23. 

Herbert Haier, driving, ovt. truck, slridded on the road at lower 
end of fiibbon Iteadowe at entrance to canyon on August 30. The truck 
collided with slide rock by the roadside. The road had bean recently oiled 
and was slippery. Two passengers, Andrew Olswold and leter G. Doonan, 
rovernraent eeiployees, received minor bruises and cuts* 

Alfred Theurer, driving Chevrolet, Utah, Lie. Ho. 68173* and 
Charles Phillips, driving Cadillac, New York Lie. ITo. 8850, in collision on 
Mammoth - Gardiner highway* The ears collided on a curve. The damage was 
estimated at about #50 to each oar. An agreement was reached, eaeh party 
agreeing te pay for the damage to his own oar. 

Yellow bus No. 348, collided with an Oklahoma Reo, driven by 
James ?. Langmaok, two and one half miles inside the park, on the Wtm 
afctrunce road, August *$• The care ast on a curve, and the Reo oar was 
slightly damaged, when struck by the bus* 

Special Incidents 

Mrs. Gertrude Valeeuela, of Laurel, Montana, while walking a 
log across the lower tjeyser basin, slipped into the hot water when the 
ground gave may* She received a second degree burn on left foot and leg* 

Mrs. Parker, wife of ■•G.Parker, owning .Jtudebaker, Lie. Ko. 11941t 
Missouri, was run over by the right front wheel of the itarker ear, in front 
of Haynes Picture Shop at Fiehing Bridge, August 3* Mrs* Parker was direct- 
ing Mr. Parker while he was backing his oar off the read, and the front 
wheel knocked her down, passing over both ankles, bruielng and spraining them 
eeverely* The nurse from Lake Hotel oared for the injuries* 

Lieut* John R. Grume, driving a Pord, &odel«A coupe. Lie* Ho* 3548, 
Oolo*, started to pass a Pord, &odel««i trad':, Lie. Ho. T50329t driven by 
Virgil JLvis, age 17* and owned by G.D.Duvis* Lieut. Crume started to pass 
on almost a blind curve, on the Lake Junction - Canyon Junction road, about x 
four miles from Canyon Junction* As he was abreast the truck they brushed 
fenders, so slightly that the paint wasnt scratched* Virgil Davis eeemed to 
lose control of the truck, which was overloaded, and drove it to the edge of 
the road, where it turned over completely onoe, and landed on its wheels. 
One boy, five years old, was killed instantly, and another boy, 11, wae in- 
jured badly* This boy, however, recovered at i-jaimoth Hospital* The dead ami 
injured boys were taken to Canyon Lodge dispensary by Lieut. Grume and from 
there were taken to Uawnoth Hospital* The oause of the aooldent seemed to 
be that the heavy, over-loaded truck got out of control, anrt was literally 
pulled off the road by the top heavy load when it got near the edge of the 
road. Ur. C.D.Davis, father of the dead boy, is starting suit a ainst Lieut. 
Crume, for damage to the trite, and expenses in lieu of the death of his son. 

-17- 



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o*fli!>W Islets 

i« «I.vttr».I lo , la? ofcrxMeO •■ 

tfiaod tooTfcOr: DftftDl orft iootioa BOl 
to! no murtf oo tsoo ficcaoa 4B oorlooo? tw!? «^.iw rrqg fin.* 



"S 1 ,00J 



1 W c ttat Oov; ,l*u/OB»JUZ 

oils o- loo^aH to 

om; or! oJ.tr: * •*•* i .' •*!! v/rl 

atteoq ,rcob «foif fcoftomT Ieofl> 

■xiii aartt —xim orfT •xloiovoe 



occt «AoAoo.ctoio b» 

UO JbftbfUiX &f(0 ,0000 

o*t* 

• lo vr.jbf) an\ 



afot • 

a ew"or 

o bttft # YJ 

-u/o build m IcooiLu no 
£ taw «f .-j *. t eftXIn viol 

oo ,t¥eJtao>l 
* orf* to Xo . 

JOOfKfl* #1 OWfW t O*0T orfi 

to rij«j orll ,xotf OJftO 

OvI ocxooC o* sKtoi oiow txotf Z 

to . lot 1<£ -nei-: * 

•t>":ioI--.'j\to .^cad oiU '^-a»J erf 

^a ui t ^orf '-i-.r nrfi lo iftii^r.i ,«i 



m 9td to k^oti mU to »U M HMflMJM ^^- f -ra-*>j «tt oi 



tfllllaa T. l&ran, of Ho N* Monroe St., Itusville, fe* was 
found dead in his zoom at Lake Hotel, on the raornin of sal ust Jl fl at about 
8*30 am* He had died during the ni f ;ht, due to apoplexy. The body was sent 
to llamnoth the 31st, accompanied by the decedent's sister and brother-in-law, 
Mr* and lire. H. K* Flanders. Dr* uraco examined the body* 

Bear Bites 

Harry Johnson, night watchman at Old Faithful* Major Injuries!; 
on thi; hs t and scratches on face and arms, caused by grlesly bear bite* He 
was sent to Ifemmoth Hospital* rime - August 2j place - bear feeding 
grounds at Old faithful* 

Kleanor eVi Kase, rittsburg, Kansas* Miner injuries on left thigh 
caused by bear bite* Time - 4a§Mrti 13l place - Apollinarls Spring* 

900 - III see 1 Ian sous 

Poet Offioe i Business of the post of floe and stations was about 
normal for iwtfis%< 

Church Jerri cost Catholic masses were held in the MswH Chapel 
every Sunday morning during August, at 6 an and 8 am* 

Bpisoopal services wore held in the Chapel at 10*30 am and 8 pa 
en August 4 by Rt. Hey* H*H*Fox* Bishop Coadjutor of Montana* 

Uethodist services were held by Her* • *aiton, on Incest 11. 
both mo mint; and evening. 

Baptist services were held morning and evening of August 18 by 
Rev* Thos. L* Huxley* 

Congregational services were held morning end evening of ^u.ust 25 
by Rev. 3*R*iioCarthy* 

Hospital and Medical Services* Br* Prank G. :race, resident 
physician reports approximately 375 •alls, minor operations, dressings, etc* 
durin the month whioh includes both residence calls and hospital patients* 

T-.V0 deaths were reported - Ha* Ma 11 on, acute mania - at hospital 
and • . iioran - heart disease - at Lake Hotel* 



-IP- 



iruc 



. 






• 



m 






: 






\m 



::/C Vi. V'.tW :<.:? 






• 






'CL r " 'k— .tP 



■ 



'frflM-:'- r 






>*_» 



The Yel iowstone Boundary GoRKiissian spent the first few days 
of the mouth In the Beohler River vjortion of the park* and in ashton, 
Idaho, and adjacent territory* On August 4 they returned to Sfammoth* 
On AU£Ast 5» t^y k*l fl an all day meeting and allied on Director J&M 
to ireseut additional information on certain points* The raerabors of the 
Commission left the park on August 5, 6 and 7* 

^or^ truly youra, 



mj ,.}erintaadent 



mm f tr? 



.•»: wmt 



to 



10-157 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



TRAVEL 



REPORT 



Yellowstone 



National Park for the Month of 



August 




Increase for 
Travsl Year 



o Date I Number Percent 



II VATE TRANSPORT AT I ON : 

irs first entry, 23817 59299 20142 49961 

irs reentry, 1870 3668 1546 2935 

jtorcyclfis, _J53_ 165. 47 142 



9338 19 

733 25 
23 16 



ITotal 


motor vehicles, . . . 

entering via motor 
J, 


25730 
.84237 


63132 


21735 


53038 


10094 


19 


arsons 
nicies 


203197 


71189 


L 71585 


31612 


18 


irsons entering via other 
•ivate transportation, . . . 

Total persons entering via 
private transportation, . . 

IHER TRANSPORTATION: 


190 


767 


145 


613 


154 


25 


84427 


203964 


71334 


172198 


31766 


18 














Arsons 


entering via stages, 


• 












irsons 


entering via trains, 


• 13339 


33433 


15010 


36081 


2648 


-7 • 


Irsons 
total 
{BRAND 


entering otherwise, 
other transportation, 
TOTAL ALL VISITORS, . 


























. 977*6 


JK57397— 


86344 J 


208279- 


29118 


JA_ 












This 


Last 


Inci 


-ease 












Year 


Year 






Number 


Percent 


ttoraob 


Lies in public camps du 


ring mor 


th, 27803 










unpers 


in public camps during 


month, 


86867 


• 











r 23TAT3 03T 

flOI«3TMI 3HT 30 TV^MTflAqSCl 
3DIVH33 ^HAS JAUOITAH 



T H O S 3 H 



_i 3 V A H T 



10M erf. :l£W 



wmtwwol 



TO'J Ufll 

1*8 



Jneo TecfmuM 




ax 
levBiT 



rf-tnoM 



«I 



JUL 






61 



[Mtft 






HI 



MtJ 

.51 



Mi 
Ml 



M*V:r 



SI0X5 imiti ce 



aarr: aexstx mi *s<gos 



:K0ITATH(H3WAHT 3TA 

TIttt { ^Tjne JeTi*i 

.Yi^neei 

■ ; . .eelOMOi 

JS9P. . . ,8eIoJcrfev ToJotn isi 

-iotom sxv §nxT8Jne sno 
I IM , e«io 

T9riJ-o biv sniTeJne 8no 
0^1 .... f noiJ-B^Toqen£Tj- ei& 

sxv snxTeJrie enosieq Istfi 
T^?® • • • .noiJfiJ-ioqanBTj eJsvx 

:H0ITATH013HAHT HI 



T- 



MM 



mm 



firrt? rntnfi? iim 



, aegjsJa &iv gnxTs^ne enoi 

.anxfiiJ .Bxv snxTeJne enoi 

,9aiwTeffJo gnxieJne 8noi 

. f nox^BvtToqanBTJ tedfo L&i( 

. . r 330TI3IV JJA JATOT (WAS 



"ton I 



ineoiel Tecfmi/Jl 




otn aniiijfc aqmeo otlduq nx eelxcfomc 



J- 158 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



STATUS OF AUTHORIZED PROJECTS 
..T^^STCiB National Park for the Month of 4?????.t..*S?S. 



Description of Projects 



Percent j Percent Percent Probable 
Constructed j Constructed j Constructed j te of 

To Date I This Month Last Month Completion 



Horris-Mamraoth - 3 mile section 

Vast Gallatin - Grayling Creek Section 

East Entrance - no data submitted by B»P«K» 

Madison Junction museum and snoeshoe cabin 

Stable at Lake 

Stable at Canyon 

Museum at Norris 



Ifo work 

90$ completed 

95$ completed 

50$ completed 

10$ completed 

5$ completed 



S3TATa Q3TIHU 

HOmaTHI 3HT lO TH3MTJRAq3a 

33IVH3S HAAS JAMOITAM 

Oflq aaSTHOHTUA 10 3 U T A T 3 






!neS .30^q 5 q 



tanoO|l>eJom oO j a.toecoiq "\o noiiqi^j 

.1 j rfJnoM aiffT | 9 J* 3 oT 



*• °^ acliote i - ft#ceariUal?to1 

atfrfa© t«rfa«oza bast ausauB noe nd 






• ?. v 



a i viol *« a»«aid 



0-159 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

STATUS OF PERSONNEL 

YELLOf/DTCHS National Park for the Month of f : 



>r of promotions during month. . . 



jgregate amount of annual leave taken 
[gregate amount of sick leave taken . 
{gregate amount of leave without pay. 









This This Month 

Month Last Year 



^ber of employees beginning of month 

»ber of additions 
Total . . 

fcber of separations 

fcber of employees close of month . . 



U4 



5 

140 137 



17 17 



4 i 



3 









83TATa aHTIMU 

HomaTw 3ht 10 TuaMTflA^aa 

30IVH35 XflA«R JAMOITAM 

janHoeaai to e u t a r 

lo rfJnoM >Jij3q IflnoxJ.BM 



■ 



rfJnoM eirfT airfT 






rfJnoM 






... rfJnom lo aninnisstf aee^oIqra9 lo 19( 
anoiiibbs 1c 

. I&SO'; 

«*. anoi^fiisqaa lo ie( 

... i; iiom 1o eaolo aea^olqaia lo ief 



riJriom §ni"ijjJb 8noi,totncnq lo ie< 



Iff 

jr 



n9>(6J. avsal Isunnfi lo .tru/oas 9^B89* 

» n9}{fii 9VJ39I J{0i8 .10 ^njjQOlB 9-Jj3§9" 

. \;£q Suocitiw 9VB9I 1o inuotns 9^£§9' 



1-160 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL Park service 

REPORT OF PARK REVENUES 
-VBflMNN National Park for the Month of J90Mf * M$ 






This Last 
Year Year 



rk revenue on hand beginning of month .... 0,00 

Jeived 70,582.55 

Total 

litted 

hand close of month , 



70,582.55 
70,582.55 



rk revenues received this year to date j*^ j^p 10 

hs revenues received last year to date 129.755.25 

Increase. , . , 13, 366 . 8 5 

Percent of increase 10$ 



I 1 v-'C 

S3TATa OHTIHU 
HOm3THI 3HT ^O TH3MTHAS3a 
3DIVH33 XHA^ JAUOITAH 

a 3 u h a v aa. n a 1 io Tflo^aa 






•J8J3J 

1J59Y tfieY 



»• ■ 



,0 .... .... rfJTiom lo gninniaecf £nsrf riu 

£)9vi( 

-f^o' 

t9 ^< 

■ • . .fttnom 1q eaolo 



Qt&b o^ ijssy airf-J bsyieoez aounevei : 

.pSl et&b oi i&ex 3b&L bevieoai aauneva-i 3 



seseioi 



eeBeTonx lo Jnaois^ 



1161 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVfCE 

REPORT OF SALES OF PUBLICATIC 



Ifrimoth im , i6\m~—-lGf2$- 



JVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS: 



m 






* 



hand beginning of month - 
;eived during month . . . . 

Total 

d during month 

On hand at close of month 

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS: 



147 
3075 
3222 

3109 
I3j 



64,15 
1642.65 
1706.80 
1659.60 

47-20 



■ hand beginning of month . 
■eived during month. . . . 
■Total .....,..., 

feci daring month 

hand at close of month 



land beginning of month - 

during month 

tal 



ii ted during month, 
ance 



90 


127.30 


501 


530.44 


591 


657.74 


515 


546.04 



76 



111.70 



10.00 

2205.64 
2215.64 

2200.00 
10.00 



( 



e3TAT2 03TIMU 

^O TH3MT5RAq3a 
H33 *flAS JAUOITAH 



au? 



3 3 J A 2 10 TH013E 



. 








, J\*l 




, 


e 







■ 



oe 






.51 

.DJC 



PSPi - can .nY rfif 

:3HOITA0IJ8lH TH3 

. rttnom lo §ninnig 

rttnom %niiisb I 

U 

.rttnom anii.> 
rftno"' ^Q 98QI0 S& E 

rSKOITAOIJSlH ™MHH3V0fr 

. . rttnora 1o §ninnigetf bnsj 

riJnom sni'iui) Jbevii 

, . . L&to' 



. ittaoffl lo . Ja m bn*. 

-ittnc 

fiJnpm a : 

, 

.riJnom an iiub i 

. . 



♦■161 UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

R E F B T OF SALES OF PUBLICATIONS 



Ld Eal thful I&tgoua - August 192 9 



0VERNMENT PUBLICATIONS: 



Total 



On hand at close of month 



h on hand "beginning of month. 
Mes during month , 



Total ....... 

ed during month, 
Balance , 



dumber 



I hand beginning of month 7r»c 108.50 

eceived during month -2295 956*75 



2670 1165^5 



bid during month y^i $01.00 

On hand at close of month . , . flH| ^264*25 



3N- GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS: 

■hand beginning of month m^a 672.90 

fceived during month 406 467.35 

■ Total 810 11/10.25 

3ld during month 473 562.05 



3$f^==^ 57$^ 



369.35 
1363-05 
1732.40 
1450.00 



f 

23TAT2 OBTIMU 
flOI«3TH! 3HT 10 TMaMTHA^acI 
MflA^ JAMOITAM 

J A 8 ! fl 



— 






_:3HOITA0IJ5Li 

;-w. citr.oa to gninnig 

rttnom gni-iub f 

• • • ■ ■ IsJoT 

. rfJnom sniiJjfi £ 
•■ p rttn< p lo eso' [ qc 

;8g0XTA0IJ 

yjk rfJnoni to sninni§ecf 

rftfnom gni'iub Jbsvis 

- - 

. .rfJnom anii: 
. rfvtnom lo 

• ■ -nM. 

o^. 



1-162 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

REPORT OF TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH BUSINESS 



Y3LL0V73TCHB 



Nation?! Park for the Month of 



AUGUST 1929 



)CAL BUSINESS 

lies of circuit maintained 
k of telephones c cted 



1 of measured service sails 

j. cf other local calls 
kal No of local calx. 
kk load in calls per day. 



Th i s 



This 
Mont3: 



Increase 



nth fear I 



518 
166 



I7O38 

w 



24 

10 



19959 -2921 
961 - 219 



■ ■■• 

:ase 



.048 

•064 



-146 
.•227 



iceipts from measured service calls 

iceipts from coin boxes 

iceipts from telephone rental, 



TOTAL RECEIPTS 

I. Outbound calls . . . 

I Inbound calls . . . 

TOTAL LONG DISTANCE CALLS 

Be load in calls per day 

leipts from Long Distance business. , 



142 
140 



20 

$85-90 



lbb 
153 



-24 
-13 



.004 



20 

no other information - 



GHAPH BUSINESS 



fesages via Western Union 

ssages via 

TOTAL MESSAGES 



jceiptp from telegraph business. 

money transfer messages . . 
. of money transfer receipts. . 



L RECEIPTS TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH DEPT- 



9 

5TII/IU 



XF»A«* JAHOITAV1 



■BflM ...u« 












• ■ : 






i 



- 









, 



■ 
i 






30-163 






UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

♦ELECTRICITY GENERATED, SOLD, USED, ETC 
National Park for the Month of 



rtfLLC/STOIK 



Aur-ust I929 



This This Last 

This J Travel | Month Travel 

Month Year Last Year 

I To Date I Year To Date 



Increase for 
Travel Year 



Number 



Percent 



rent generated, . . 
4 to park operators, 
d to others, . . . 



78720.0 I5758O.O 9275O.O l806O0.O -53020.0 -.12 
22165.4 43626.7 31377*0 C$293.9 -22067.2 -.34 



nished to other Governmental 
agencies, 

led by National Park Service, 
lost in transit, etc., . . . 

Total current generated, . . 



56554.6 113953.3 61373.O II4506.I -352.8 -.03 



_7&^Q 1 &a5758&aQ._92_75a t GA^^ 



oount receivable from the sale of electricity, . . . 



IIO8.27 



indicated by K. W. H. 



aSTATS CI3TIHU 

HOm3TW 3HT 30 TU3MTHAq3a 

3DIVA38 XftA^ JAUOITAH 






tol e8J58ionI 



3 ( a33u ,ajoa ,aaTAH3Piao YTIOIflToaJa , 



rWnoM er(J- io1 jHbS Ijsnoi.tJ5H 



Jneoie'I i9cftnjjW 



Saad airlT siriT 

XevBiT rftfnoM j XevBiT | alrfT 

1.69Y -tasJ 1.68Y | rfJnoM 

9^£Q oT 1B9Y \etsQ. oTl 



m 






. . f £>9Jjsi9n93 Jr 

,8io>tBT9qo ^.i&q pi 

. . . t aiedto oJ 



.- 






lJsJ"n9inm9VoD laciio oi berii 

( 89I0f 

( 90ivT98 iLibI LeaoLiBK \;c 
., . ,5a^BT9n93 inaiiuo It 



, - • .., 3 



Xiio'LitoeLQ lo 9ljss edt moil alcfsviaoaT i 



.H .W .51 ^tf beJEOi 



Q 
Ko. 1030— Met'L 



tx_ 



T 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, WEATHER BUREAU. 

\ 2 I 2 = - 

MONTHLY METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY. 

wo«4 -_-____§• , i^ 9 



ifow, - ' Ml^tcgt f*A • 



Teuperatuee. 

(Degrees Fahrenheit.) 






Max. 



79 
77 



.7.5 
.7.6. 

BJ 
.78 

if. 

.81 
.84 
85 

86 
87 

JL 

.81. 

81 

.51. 
ft 

79 



79 



81 



ft 



10 



r-z 



30 



83 



80 



7A 

78 
80 



Min. 



81 

50. 

48.. 

.53.. 
50. 
50 

JL 

.42 

47 
4? 
45 
4.6 

44 

60 
.48. 
51 
55 
53 
52 



Mean. 



JL 

64 
.67. 
64. 

JL 
JL 

60. 

60 

68 

JL. 
64 

JL 

.66 

66 

.79 

64 

.66 

JL 

66 

66 



Precipita- 
tion. 

(In inches 

arid 

hundredths.) 



48 



48 



52 



M 



H 



50 



53 



52 



79.8 



54 
52 
53 



M 



M 



m 



M 



6f 



« 



68 



66 



tt.fitfua 



.65 

66. 
66 



Bttil- 

Cbaracter Ejjhin© 



of day. 



08 ?tCld^ 

P.. tQM r 



XLtftY 



•li-JBBSfe 



P. 
t 



MwnJar 
tntr 



.03 PtCldy 



JL 
P 
P. 

P 


P 




T 



p. 



•02 

P 




.02 



01 



:i«ar 

!*8iL 

DM 
:iear 

XUvur _ 

sioudy 

Cljar 

tciay 
pioudy. 

lear 
:iear 



:iear 



atwr 



-tcidy 



tcidy 



tcidy 



PMLif 



flat. 



63 

!f_ 

77 

86. 
56 

8L 

98 

ft 

LOO 
LOO 

LOO 

IfiL 

53 

80 

m 

58. 
81 

94 



100 



LOO 



if 



M 



$0 



74 



Cloudy 



•44 



Cloudy 



.57 




Cloudy 
PtCldy 
Clear 



Total. 



n 



1:5 



29 
71 
99 

79 



ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE. 



(Reduced to soa level; inches and hundredths.) 

Mean^9__\P2_„„_. highest JS^SL.. date — 

29*77 



lowest is.!?*-!..* , date. 



UJ 



TEMPERATURE. 
Highest -8.7. ., date 14 ; lowest U_ date. J 



Greatest daily range ?!~ , date . ■ 



BO 



10 



81 

82 
83. 
84. 
85. 



Least daily range **— , date 

'Ti^™:!oTS3J. N ~ ii56..... 2ii 
92 61 02 59... 12 66 226S 

93.— 03_?k 13§* 2358 

94 68 04 60. 1459. 248P. 

95 .??. 05 62 . 15 61. 9.4 

86. 96.60 06 59 16§§- 

87 .631 .... 97 62 07 56 i?59_ 

88.61— _ 98.9^..... 08* J— i8?7 2 

89 JL— 99 6.7. 09 6g___._. 19 61 %M 

90.61. oo_6l ... 10 57 206? 

Absolute maximum for this month for _*S years —22- J... 

At* 

Absolute minimum for this month for _**i years ...zi!f. 



1871 
1872 ..... 
1873 
1874 

1875 ..... 
1876 
1877 .— . 

187S - 

1879 ..... 

1880 

Normal for this month 



. 25*?*?. 

. 20.V-,-- 
2756 

■ M 

29* 
30 



Average daily excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) of this month as compared 
with the normal *___ i?.?L! l L » _> _ 

Accumulated excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) since January 1 ~?~~- * — 
Average daily excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) since January 1 — TrA? — 



Total this month . 



,:.:? 



PRECIPITATION. 

....; snowMl i 
Greatest precipitation in 24 hours .... • 
Snow on the ground at end of month .. 

TOTAL PRatlPlgmoN THIS JWBNTH f\— ( 

si $764" S •"61"" 5 .66 

,06 n o .45 5.58 



¥cm 



date-.28.A-29. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 



83 

84 
85. 
86 
87 



VOL 



03 



- 05 



.32 



- «_r °- 

•"6«;; 9|; ? ;23 
•77.. j)?^??— 10 

Normal for this month „.*• — 




Excess ( + ) i or deficiency ( — ) of this month as compared with the nor- 

-3.64 



mal. 



Accumulated excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) since January 1 

MEAN RELATIVE HUMIDITY (Percentage). 

6 looh 31 6 _ _ 33 



a. m., 



Prevailing direction . 



- p. m., 
WIND 



.; p. m. 



4658 _ 

-total movement miles; 

C S 
average hourly velocity - ; maximum velocity (for five 



minutes) - 



on 



■■>' 



— miles per hour, from 



WEATHER. ^ . 

Number of days, clear ; partly cloudy ; cloudy 

on which .01 inch, or more, of precipitation occurred 



MISCELLANEOUS PHENOMENA (dates of) 

2* 

Auroras.- ; halos: solar—.. , lunar _. 

0,0 

Hail -j sleet -: Jog --.—-—- 

__ri_taJ}4i____!_!_fii__-_-^ 

* Frost: light - ; heavy — ; killing 







Note. — "T" indicates trace of precipitation, 
ie autumn frosts are not recorded after the occurrence of "killing," except in Florida and along the immediate coast of the Gulf of Mexico. 

~*lon Jeff«racn, retooroloftint 

Weather Bureau. 



UOTIKHllKYr rBlWTl.NO 0FT101 



.UA3HUa H3HTA3 



.YJIAMMU8 , 



r 



i r> 



HirrjijomDjA ^o i gg rflAqaa .$ g 

m -^ 



CO ' 






2 



z 

I 




to 
H 
> 

H 


z 



C7= 



C^2 



2 
O 

z 

H 
I 

r 
-< 



> 

H 
I 
m 

TJ 

c 

m 
> 

c 



D 

5 



m 

2 
H 
O 

> 

o 

3 
o 

c 

g 

c 
m 









- 















oe 


















TOT 






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■ 





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» 






DEPARTMENT CP TEE INTERIOR 

NAT I OPAL PARK SERVICE 
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

1929 COMPARATIVE TRAVEL FIGURES WITH 1928 AND 1927 

SEASON TO AUGUST 15TH, INCLUSIVE. 

19 2 9 





RAIL (People) 




MI SOL. 

People 


• 
• 

TOTAL : 


ENTRANCE 


Hotels : Camps 


: Total 
: Rail 


MOTOR 
Cars : People 


North 


4463 : 3590 


: 8053 


10729 


: 33299 


296 


; 41,648 : 


West 


7766 : 6189 


: *13955 


17684 


. 58666 : 


170 


72.791 


East 


2907 ; 2408 


5315 


17105 


55210 


224 


60,749 : 


South 


140 : 132 


272 


5655 


18030 : 


18 


18.320 


TOTALS 


15276 : 12319 


27595 


51373 


165205 


708 


193,508 : 






19 2 8 



ENTRANCE 


RAIL (People) 


MOO 
Cars 


?0R 
People 


■ MISCL, 
People 


TOTAL : 


Hotels 


Camps 


i Total 
: Rail 


North 


4341 


4271 


8612 


10763 • 


33781 


163 


42,556 : 


West 


8352 


6775 


#15127 


15427 : 


51264 


123 


66,514 : 


East 


2688 


2708 


5396 


13027 


41935 


246 


47,577 : 


South 


53 




53 


3911 : 


12612 


42 


12,707 


TOTALS 


15434 


13754 


i 29188 


43128 ! 


159592 


, 57_4___ 


• 169,354 .: 








: 


[927 











RAIL (People) 




MISCL. 
. People 


: TOTAL 


ENTRANCE 


Hotels 


Camps 


Total 
: Rail 


MOO 
Cars 


:or 

People 


North 


4359 


4566 


3925 


7254 


22687 


174 


31,786 : 


West 


. 8245 


6893 


15133 


14C59 


46514 


51 


61,703 : 


East 


2745 


2940 


5685 


12793 


40735 


203 


46,623 : 


South 


41 


34 


75 


2559 ■ 


3036 


48 


8,159 : 


TOTALS 


15390 


14433 


29823 


36665 


117972 


476 


148.271 



TRAVEL R ECORDS B RO KEN IN 1929 ,. 

Largest day's entrance travel in history of the park, 4452 on August 8th; 
previous record, 4212 on July 4, 1929. 

Largest number of motor vehicles entering park on a single day, 1082 on August 
8th; previous record, 1076 on July 4th of this season. 

TRAV EL SUMM ARY THIS SEASON TO DATS 

Total travel to August 15th, 193,508; last year, 169,354; gain, 34,154. 

Total travel for month, 53,877; last year, 47,419; gain, 16,458. 

Rail travel for the month, 7501; last year, 8117; loss, 616. 

Average daily travel this month to date, 3592; as compared with 3161 last year, 

Average daily entrance of autos during month to date, 953; as compared with 
788 last year 

* U. P. 11,121, CM. & St. P.P., 2489, N. P. 345; Total, 13,955. 

# U. P. 12,491, CM. & St. P.P., 2438, N. P. 198; Total, 15,127. 



J) 



1 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

1929 COMPARATIVE TRAVEL FIGURES WITH 1928 AND 1927 
SEASON TO AUGUST 31ST, INCLUSIVE 

19 2 9 





: RAIL (People) 


MOTOR 


MISCL. 
People 










: Total 
Rail 




ENTRANCE 


Hotels 


Camps 


Cars 


People 


TOTAL 


North 


5282 


4457 


9739 


12563 


39057 


326 


49.1^-2 


West 


♦9454 


#7458 : 


16912 


: 21815 


: 71670 


185 


88,767 


Last 


3656 


2847 


6503 


21466 


• 69116 


237 : 


75,856 


South 


147 


132 


279 


7288 


23354 


19 : 


23 , 652 


'OTALS 


18539 


14894 


33433 . 


63132 


203197 : 


767 j 


237.397 



19 2 8 





RAIL (People) 


: MOTOR 


. MISCL. 
People 


TOTAL : 




Hotels 


Camps 


Total 
Rail 


ENTRANCE 


Cars 


People 


North 


5665 


. 5145 


10810 


12484 


39156 


169 


50.135 : 


West 


10350 


8141 


♦♦18491 


18804 


62578 


132 


81.201 : 


East 


3450 


3272 • 


6722 


• 16604 


53257 


268 


60.247 : 


South 


58 




58 


5146 


16594 


44 


16,696 : 


OTALS 


19523 


16558 


36081 • 


53038 


171585 


613 


208.279 : 



19 2 7 





: RAIL (People) 


MOTOR 


. MISCL. 
People 


TOTAL : 




Hotels 


• Camps 


: Total 
Rail 


ENTRANCE 


Cars 


People 


North 


5577 


: 5816 


11393 


8588 


26908 


213 


38,514 : 


West 


. 10058 


8316 


: 18374 


17073 


56464 


54 


74.892 : 


East 


: 3493 


3572 


7065 


15856 


50452 


220 


57.737 : 


South 


56 


47 


103 


3333 


10505 


60 • 


10.668 : 


OTALS 


: 19184 


17751 


: 36935 


44850 


144329 


547 


181.811 : 



TRAVEL RECORDS BROKEN IN 192 9 

Largest day's entrance travel in history of the park_, 4452 on August 8th; 
previous record, 4212 on July 4 r 1929. 

Largest number of motor vehicles entering park on a single day, 1082 on August 
8th; previous record, 1076 on July 4th of this season. 

TR AVEL SUMMARY THIS SEASON TO DATE 

Total travel to August 31st, 237,397; last year, 208,279; gain, 29,118. 
Total travel for month, 97,766; last year 86,344; gain 11,422. 
•Rail travel for the month, 13,339; last year 15,010; loss 1671. 
Average daily travel this month to date, 3154, as compared with 2785 last year. 
Average daily entrance of autos during month, 831; as compared with 701 last year 

♦ U. P. 7969, C. M. & St. P. P. 1415, N. P. 70; Total Hotels, 9454. 

# U. P. 5590, C. M. & St. P. P. 1552, N. P. 316; Total Camps, 7458. 
Total West Gate rail travel, 16,912. 

♦♦ U.P. 15,212, C. M. & St. P. P. 3038; N. P. 241; Total, 18,491. 



• r 



-• .• 



: 



Tit/ 



\lu . 



dxAIEHjV SHOWING AUTOMOBILE TRAVEL BY 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - June, July and August 1929. 



■AME OP STATE 


: N0RT1 
: Cars 


I 

:Passen 
: gers 


: WES! 
: Cars 


r 

rPassen- 

: gers 


: EA! 
:Cars 


3T : SOI 
:?ass-: 

rengersCars 


JTH 

:Pass- 

:enger 


: TCTj 
3 Cars 


LL : 

•Pass- 
engers 


Alabama 


: 7 


: 19 


: 23 


: 81 


25 


: 72 


: 6 


: 22 


: 61 


: 194 




Arizona 


: 43 


t 122 


: 210 


: 585 


: 55 


: 168 


: 25 


: 66 


: 333 


: 961 




Arkansas 


: 14 


: 46 


: 53 


: 175 


: 64 


: 211 


: 18 


60 


: 149 


: 492 




California 


: 1007 


: 2803 


: 3716 


: 10671 


: 1312 


: 3965 


: 512 


: 1483 


: 6547 


:18927 




Colorado 


: 194 


: 562 


: 364 


: 1133 


: 1116 


: 3533 


: 510 


: 1609 


: 2184 


: 6837 




Connecticut 


14 


39 


: 24 


: 64 


: 66 


: 184 


: 10 


: 28 


: 114 


: 315 




Delaware 


: 1 


: 3 


5 


■ 20 


6 


: 10 


: 2 


: 6 


: 12 


: 39 




list, of Col. 


: 25 


63 


: 27 


77 


: 58 


: 148 


: 16 


: 50 


: 126 


: 338 




Florida 


38 


: 98 


: 77 


: 213 


: 78 


- 233 


: 36 


: 118 


: 229 


: 662 




Georgia 


8 


: 28 


: 15 


45 


: 32 


: 93 


: 


: 35 


: 63 


: 201 




Idaho 


205 


629 


: 2906 


i 11312 


: 134 


: 437 


: 421 


: 1523 


: 3746 


: 13901 




Illinois 


441 


1399 


: 557 


: 1716 


: 1983 


: 6415 


: 366 


: 1123 


: 3350 


:10653 




Indiana 


117 • 


• 374 


: 267 


: 887 


: 499 


< 1604 


: 105 


: 318 


: 988 


: 3183 




Iowa 


291 


955 


313 


: 1067 


: 1343 


: 4406 


: 208 


: 659 


: 2155 


: 7087 




Kansas 


154 


512 


: 353 


: 1182 


: 1033 


: 3547 


: 444 


: 1534 


: 1984 


: 6775 




Kentucky 


20 


66 j 


63 


: 217 


79 


: 236 


: 19 


: 66 


: 181 


: 635 




Louisiana 


14 : 


40 


49 


186 


41 


: 145 


: 23 


: 79 


: 127 


: 450 




Maine 


10 : 


32 


15 


44 


10 


27 


: 1 


: 2 


: 56 


: 105 




Maryland 


10 - 


27 : 


18 


: 68 


45 


: 138 


: 12 


: 36 


85 


: 269 




Massachusetts 


40 s 


128 « 


83 


222 


178 


: 487 


: 29 


: 79 


: 330 


: 916 




Michigan 


250 : 


726 - 


282 


864 


960 


: 2945 


: 154 


: 448 


: 1646 


: 4983 




Minnesota 


653 i 


2081 : 


285 


907 


972 


• 3039 


: 60 


177 


: 1970 


: 6204 




Mississippi 


7 . 


27 < 


28 < 


84 


22 


74 


9 


35 


: 66 


: 220 




Missouri 


108 ; 


355 • 


290- 


982 • 


748 


2552 


: 215 


: 692 


: 1361 


: 4581 




Montana 


2791 • 


9291 : 


2308 - 


7931 : 


973 


. 3322 


: 106 


316 


: 6178 


:20660 




Nebraska 


214 : 


688 • 


264 - 


860 : 


1215 


: 4136' 


. 339 


1092 


: 2032 


i 6776 




Nevada 


27 : 


70 ! 


144: 


427 


27 


02 


10 


28 


: 208 


: 607 




New Hampshire 


6 : 


17 ! 


12: 


31 : 


8 


30 


5 


12 


31 


90 




New Jersey j 


68 . 


189 : 


98 


296 : 


187 


: 543 


: 36 


110 


: 389 


: 1136 




Nov/ Mexico 


24 : 


86 • 


43- 


124 : 


55 


! 193 


25: 


73 


: 147 


: 476 




Now York 


174 : 


516 : 


276: 


012 : 


634: 


1761 


: 107 


307 


: 1191 


3396 




North Carolina ■ 


12 : 


31 : 


32: 


165 : 


25: 


88 


, 27: 


152 


96: 


436: 




North Dakota 


445 : 


1449 : 


142: 


522 j 


326 


1091 


14: 


43 


: 927 


. 3105: 




Ohio 


184 « 


530 : 


448: 


1353 : 


884 • 


2679: 


188: 


595 


• 1704 « 


5157 




Oklahoma « 


96 : 


318 : 


297; 


1032 : 


541 • 


1831: 


256: 


843 


: 1190- 


4024- 




Oregon 


181 ■ 


545 : 


821; 


2516 : 


169: 


539 : 


52- 


150 


: 1223 


3750 




Pennsylvania 


115 : 


339 : 


308: 


959 : 


404; 


1233: 


116: 


355: 


943< 


2086: 




Rhode Island ; 


5 : 


18 : 


5: 


13 : 


19: 


52- 


5: 


13 


34: 


96: 




South Carolina ■ 


A 

* ! 


13 : 


10: 


36 : 


9: 


28: 


4: 


10 


27: 


87: 




South Dakota 


170 : 


545 : 


102: 


329 : 


532; 


1721: 


45: 


140 


849 : 


2735: 




Tennessee : 


14 : 


51 : 


54: 


157 : 


60: 


191: 


14: 


40: 


142 : 


439: 




Texas 


117 : 


370 : 


414: 


1395 : 


725: 


2385: 


275: 


900: 


1531: 


5050: 




Utah : 


185 : 


511- : 


2622: 


9581 : 


77: 


239: 


392: 


1357. 


3276: 


11691: 




Vermont • 


5 : 


13 : 


7: 


21 : 


4 * 


12: 


6: 


18: 


22; 


64: 




Virginia ■ 


7 : 


21 : 


30: 


108 : 


'■± • z ; 


140: 


6: 


15: 


87; 


290: 




Washington • 


606 ; 


1833 : 


1174; 


3567 : 


411: 


1306: 


101: 


312: 


2292 : 


7018: 




West Virginia ■ 


13 : 


46 : 


56: 


189 : 


33: 


125: 


10: 


28: 


117: 


388: 




Wisconsin 


352 : 


1117 : 


258: 


816 : 


790: 


2475: 


63: 


191: 


1468: 


4599: 




Wyoming 


178 : 


483 : 


224 • 


703 : 


1683: 


5660: 


770: 


2581: 


2855: 


9632: 




Alaska < 


1 : 


5 : 


3: 


10 : 


2: 


6: 






6: 


21: 




Canada : 


.1 A /! 


1531 


264: 


958 : 


186: 


634: 


20: 


79: 


914: 


3202; 




Hawaii : 


4 : 


12 : 


20: 


55 : 


8: 


25: 






32: 


92: 




Canal Zone : 


1 : 


2 : 


7 : 


17 : 


& : 


10: 






10: 


29: 




hex i co : 






1; 












1: 


2: 




Philippine Is. : 










? . 


5: 


1: 


2: 


3: 


7: 




[Foreign : 


3 : 


: 


1: 


2 : 


5: 


15: 


1: 


6: 


10: 


31: 




pTALS : 


10120 : 


31795 ! 


20548 : 


67787 : 


20902: 


67104: 


6208: 


20036: 


57778: 


187102 


Cars entering second tri-o. unclassified by states : 


3632: 


11465 


Motorcycle, unclassified by states ■ 


162: 


193 


I Pro-season travel t unclassified by states ■ 


1560: 


4437 


T Grand Total, oars and visitors, classified and unclassified : 


63132: 


203197 



I 



> 



. .---JOTPJl#17.ffirr?- OF THE XXIEBXGSI 
HATI0HA1 PARK SERVICE 
YE.LLC',7STCNE ITATIPKAL .'ARK 
IELLOWSTOKB PARK, WTCSillTS 
Circular Lettar #J? 



I'-EMORANLtM TO ALL PEffiiAKBKT RA1TGSRS: 



August 6th, 1929. 



Information Is desired from 311 permanent rangers in their 
respective districts, as to the fishing during the present season. 
This information is necessary fcr the promotion of future fish propaga- 
tion in the streams of your districts. Any lakes that are uiistocked 
should be given consideration. 

Please supply the following information with respect to the 
streams in your district. 



District 



ITame cf streams 



Species of fish 



Fishing conditions 
Bocd ! Fair ' Poor 



I 



The following paragraph is a basis for judging fishing condi- 
tions . 

Given an experienced trout fisherman cf average ability; condi- 
tions ma37 be considered good when such a fisherman can take ten trout in 
four hours fishing* fair when tc take ten trout requires eight hears; 
poor when a longer time is required. 



George F. Baggley 
Chief Ranger 



SEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 
YELLOWSTONE PARK, WYOMING. 



August 6th, 1929 
CIRCULAR LETTER #14: To all temporary rangers: 



1. Do you wish to return to the park as a temporary ranger 
ne:ct year? 

Answer . 



2 # If accepted for reemployment, how definitely can you assure 
us that you will return? 

Answe r . 

3. What date do you want to "be released from service? 

Answer - September 1st, 5th, 10th, 15th, or at some later 
date. 



( Signature )_ 
REMARKS BY STATION CHIEF; 



All temporary rangers will fill out answers to questions and re- 
turn to the Chief Ranger's Office, through their station chiefs , not 
later than August 15th. When either question is answered in the af- 
firmative, the station chief will endorse with appropriate remarks 
before passing on to Chief Ranger, 

If you have any friends that want positions in the temporary ranger 
force, have them address the Superintendent before January 1st, 1930, 
and request that thoy be sent the regular application blank. Warn them 
that thoy have a poor chance of getting appointed, as there are hundreds 
of applications, and only the best qualified will bo selected. 



ROGER W. TOLL 
Superintendent 



Xepartment of the Interior 
National Park Service 



At Yellowstone Park, Wyo, 
August 6, 1929. 



MEMORANDUM FOR ALL PARK SUPERINTENDENTS: 



Through a cooperative arrangement with the United States Bureau of 
Fisheries, Mr* Fred J* Foster has "been placed in charge of an investiga- 
tion concerning fish cultural operations in the National Parks and an 
ecological study of National Park waters t He will also formulate policies 
for the distribution of fish in park waters* 

Mr, Foster is at present engaged in the study of conditions at Yel- 
lowstone and Glacier Parks and it will probably "be some months "before 
these investigations will permit him to visit other parks* Until such 
time, it is desired that the following suggestions he observed in stocking 
park waters: 

1. In certain parks there still exist lakes and streams which 
contain no fish life, known as ""barren" or "vacant" waters. 
Where such exist not fish of any species should he introduced 
without specific authority. In many instances it may be de- 
sirable to introduce certain forms of fish food and permit 
such to become abundant before fish are introduced. It is 
also planned to permit a limited area of barren waters to re- 
main so; as such would be of "biological interest to future 
generations. 

2. In the past there has been considerable mixing of species; 
cutthroat, rainbow, brook and sometimes mackinaw and Lock 
Leven have been introduced into the same waters. It is de- 
sired that this be discontinued and that where a water con- 
tains but one species of fish that future plantings be 
confined to that species until such time as investigations 
may determine other species should be introduced, 

3. The same plan should hold where two or more species are pres- 
ent; only such species as are present should be planted and 
the Superintendent may decide as to the advisability of con- 
fining the plants to one of the species present or including 
plantings of the other species which now inhabit that water. 

Should conditions arise which would lead the Superintendent to believe 
that a departure from the above suggestions would be advisable, a letter 
may be addressed to the Washington Office making the desired recommendations 
and giving the reasons therefore. 

At parks where State fish hatcheries are in operation no change in 
policy is contemplated at this time. It is desired, however, that they 
conform to the foregoing suggestions in regard to the distribution of fish. 

HORACE M. ALBRIGHT 
Director 



' 



•• 



' •' t. ■ ■■ i : 



August 12, 1929. 

MOfiORUZXJH FOR IXL 3£rLOY2K3 AMD WPLQT&& I 

Fires constitute one of the greatest perils to the park end its forests. 

The Rules and Regulations of Yellovotcne National >ark require that a 
fire permit he secured from the nearest Ranger station before building a 
fire any from a designated eaap ground* 

This season, numerous park employees have built fires without permits, 
for weinar roaet parties, etc. 2fo serious firee haw resulted from this 
practice, as yet, but to prevent any Aires from getting started, the 
following ins true tiona are issued. 

1. All persons wishing tc buildaa camp fire for any purpose 
must secure a fire permit from the nearest Ranger station. 

2. All fires built suet be extinguished with water, or moist 
earth, before leaving, and in no case shall anyone build a 
large fire. 

3. Quests at the Hotels and Lodges who ask abcut building 
fires should be referred to the ranger stations for the ir 
fire permit. 

.,ith the hearty cooperation of all park employees, we will be 
able to keep the fires down to a pilnlimnn, and keep the forests of 
Yellowstone green. 

NOTICE TO HAHAGHte OF CONCIiailOIi. : 

HmSL POJT FOR YOUR liUPLOYSSS » REFERS* US, . 



George F. Baggley 
Chief Ranger. 



fc* 6 !